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Adriano Maini
Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Alpi dell’Alta Provenza

Foto: Jean-Yves Roure

Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Alpi dell’Alta Provenza

Foto: Jean-Yves Roure

Minerve, Hérault

Fonte: Fotopedia http://ift.tt/1nNSq9C

Minerve, Hérault

Fonte: Fotopedia http://ift.tt/1nNSq9C

Estaing, Aveyron, Midi-Pyrénées, sul Cammino di Santiago di Compostela 

Foto: Jean-Pierre Roche

Estaing, Aveyron, Midi-Pyrénées, sul Cammino di Santiago di Compostela

Foto: Jean-Pierre Roche

bofransson:

Maurice Utrillo
Maison de santé du docteur Marteau à Bourg-la-Reine, 1923

bofransson:

Maurice Utrillo

Maison de santé du docteur Marteau à Bourg-la-Reine, 1923

cavetocanvas:

Charles Webster Hawthorne, The Tennis Player, 1924

cavetocanvas:

Charles Webster Hawthorne, The Tennis Player, 1924

magictransistor:

Max-Ernst. Commonplaces, Where to Unwind the Spool. 1971.

magictransistor:

Max-Ernst. Commonplaces, Where to Unwind the Spool. 1971.

urgetocreate:

Charles W, Hawthorne, October Landscape, 1923

urgetocreate:

Charles W, Hawthorne, October Landscape, 1923

Turenne, Corrèze

Fonte: Fotopedia

Turenne, Corrèze

Fonte: Fotopedia

dutch-and-flemish-painters:

xiuxiueig:

Minerva desarmada per Venus  (Al·legoria de la Pau Cateau-Cambrésis-1559)
Atribuit a Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)

Minerva disarmed by Venus (Allegory of Peace Cateau-Cambrai-1559) 
Attributed to Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)
The Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis was signed between Henry II of France and Philip II of Spain on 3 April 1559, at Le Cateau-Cambrésis, around twenty kilometers south-east of Cambrai. Under its terms, France restored Piedmont and Savoy to the Duke of Savoy, and Corsica to the Republic of Genoa, but retained Saluzzo, Calais and the Three Bishoprics: Metz, Toul, and Verdun. Spain retained Franche-Comté, but, more importantly, the treaty confirmed its direct control of Milan, Naples, Sicily, Sardinia, and the State of Presidi, and indirectly (through dominance of the rulers of Tuscany, Genoa, and other minor states) of northern Italy. The Pope was also their natural ally. The only truly independent entities on Italian soil were Savoy and the Republic of Venice. Spanish control of Italy lasted until the early eighteenth century. Ultimately, the treaty ended the 60 year, Habsburg Valois war.

dutch-and-flemish-painters:

xiuxiueig:

Minerva desarmada per Venus  (Al·legoria de la Pau Cateau-Cambrésis-1559)

Atribuit a Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)

Minerva disarmed by Venus (Allegory of Peace Cateau-Cambrai-1559) 

Attributed to Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)

The Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis was signed between Henry II of France and Philip II of Spain on 3 April 1559, at Le Cateau-Cambrésis, around twenty kilometers south-east of Cambrai. Under its terms, France restored Piedmont and Savoy to the Duke of Savoy, and Corsica to the Republic of Genoa, but retained Saluzzo, Calais and the Three Bishoprics: Metz, Toul, and Verdun. Spain retained Franche-Comté, but, more importantly, the treaty confirmed its direct control of Milan, Naples, Sicily, Sardinia, and the State of Presidi, and indirectly (through dominance of the rulers of Tuscany, Genoa, and other minor states) of northern Italy. The Pope was also their natural ally. The only truly independent entities on Italian soil were Savoy and the Republic of Venice. Spanish control of Italy lasted until the early eighteenth century. Ultimately, the treaty ended the 60 year, Habsburg Valois war.

dutch-and-flemish-painters:

Maerten de Vos (1531/32-1603) - Triptych with Crucifixion , birth and resurrection of Christ - 16th century
Marten de Vos (1532 – 4 December 1603), also Maarten, was a leading Antwerp painter and draughtsman in the late sixteenth century.

dutch-and-flemish-painters:

Maerten de Vos (1531/32-1603) - Triptych with Crucifixion , birth and resurrection of Christ - 16th century

Marten de Vos (1532 – 4 December 1603), also Maarten, was a leading Antwerp painter and draughtsman in the late sixteenth century.